Niger Experinces Worst Floods For 100 Years

Photograph taken from the ShelterBox deployment to Niger in 2010: A makeshift flood barrier provided protection and access to one family home during the floods in Niamey.

Photograph taken from the ShelterBox deployment to Niger in 2010: A makeshift flood barrier provided protection and access to one family home during the floods in Niamey.

 

A ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) is in Niger assessing the need for emergency shelter, following extreme flooding over the past month that has left thousands of families homeless. 

Reports say it is the worst flooding seen for nearly 100 years in the West African country.

At the beginning of August, rains moved north from Burkina Faso to Niger, falling over one day in the mountains in the north and running down into the southern region of Dosso.

A week later, up to 227 millimetres of rain fell overnight, which is half a year’s rainfall. The water ran through tributaries into the River Niger causing severe flooding in the regions of Tillabery in the north and the capital Niamey, flooding the city’s suburbs.

The United Nations (UN) reported that the Dosso region has been worst affected, with over 10,000 homes damaged by floodwaters.

Without shelter and food 

To date, the floods have destroyed 14,000 homes and 7,000 crop fields across the country, according to the UN’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), leaving many of the country’s poorest families without shelter and food.

With Niger already dealing with food insecurity across the Sahel region, the Malian refugee crisis, a cholera outbreak along the River Niger basin and a locust invasion, its capacity to respond to the flooding has been severely restricted.

Consequently, President Mahamadou Issou has called for international help after pledging 1,400 tonnes of food and over one million dollars of aid money for flood survivors.

Read more here: NIGER

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