Haiti Had ‘Lucky’ Escape From Isaac Storm

SRT member Jeff Pietras talking with Nalise Noel about her experience living in a ShelterBox tent, August 2012

SRT member Jeff Pietras talking with Nalise Noel about her experience living in a ShelterBox tent, August 2012

 
There is less need for emergency shelter in Haiti than expected in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Isaac, according to a ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) currently responding to the disaster in the Caribbean island. 

SRT members Mark Dyer (US) and Jeff Pietras (US) arrived in the capital Port-au-Prince on 27 August to assess the damage and need for emergency shelter, the day following the destructive path of Isaac.

Defying warnings made by the Miami-based National Hurricane Center (NHC), the storm never developed into a hurricane as it hit Haiti. Nevertheless coastal regions were battered with heavy rain and strong winds in excess of 105 kilometres-an-hour throughout the evening and early hours of the morning on 25-26 August.

‘Me and Jeff are working in country with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and local municipalities to identify humanitarian need for emergency shelter,’ said Mark.

Vulnerability 

‘With an estimated 300,000 Haitians sill living in tented camps following the earthquake in 2010, the vulnerability of the population is still very much evident.’

The storm’s force was felt the most in southeastern Haiti, especially the coastal towns around Jacmel, Cayes Jacmel and Marigot.

In the south, widespread flooding was evident; many roads were washed out, banana plantations were destroyed, and several hundred homes were damaged or in a state of disrepair. Read more here: HAITI

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