ShelterBox Response Team on the Ground in Flood-Hit Bundaberg

The clean up continues in Bundaberg's exclusion zone. Many houses will be uninhabitable for months.

The clean up continues in Bundaberg’s exclusion zone. Many houses will be uninhabitable for months.

 

Australian ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) members, Mike Greenslade and Andrew Gauci are on the ground in Bundaberg following the recent devastating floods that have caused millions of dollars worth of damage and left at least 7,000 people displaced. The flood, which peaked at a higher than expected 9.5m, swept through North Bundaberg inundating houses with water and mud

Assisted by local Rotarian and longtime ShelterBox supporter, Tom Head, the team have been meeting with local authorities, relief centres and charity groups to assess the need for  emergency shelter.

Mike said, “Our recent experience in Tasmania has once again illustrated that emergency shelter provision is not a ‘one size fits all’ solution. Many people will not be able to return to their homes for months to come as their properties have to be cleaned, treated for mould and repaired before they are safe to inhabit again. Although the local government is providing emergency shelter, it’s not suitable for everyone. We are providing an option for people that wish to remain on their property, families in remote rural areas may have livestock to look after, others may just want some privacy and independence”

Bundaberg Sunrise Rotarian, Tom Head indicates the height of the flood at 9.5m

Bundaberg Sunrise Rotarian, Tom Head indicates the height of the flood at 9.5m

 

Queensland-based SRT Andrew Gauci said, “I left my hometown of Rockhampton experiencing an 8.5m flood and have been shocked by the damaged caused by Bundaberg’s second major flood in two years. Working with local Rotarians and charities we’re hoping to find the people that may fall through the cracks. The situation is far worse than was first reported to us and our major challenge is to identify those families in need of our help.

At the height of the flood, the water speed reached 80kms an hour

At the height of the flood, the water speed reached 80kms an hour

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One comment

  1. Andrew G · February 9, 2013

    No one is immune to nature

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