Earthquakes Rumble Around the World

ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Phil Duloy at work in the ShelterBox Operations office.

ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Phil Duloy at work in the ShelterBox Operations office.

According to the US Geological Survey there are approximately 1,000,000 earthquakes around the world every year. Of these 1,000,000, approximately 1 in 10 is large enough to be felt by humans, meaning that on any given day there will be an average of 275 earthquakes large enough to be felt by populations around the world. 

Sadly many are not just large enough to be ‘felt’ by humans but are large enough to destroy entire communities as was the case on 11 March 2011 when an 8.9 magnitude earthquake struck north-east Japan. The ensuing drama saw Japan suffer devastating consequences from the most powerful earthquake since records began and further devastation caused by the resulting Tsunami. ShelterBox was quick to respond then and helped deliver aid to families in their moment of need.

Yesterday a 5.8 earthquake struck the same region of Japan but thankfully little damage occurred as a result. The Meteorological Agency issued a statement saying that it had ‘detected no significant elevation in the island’s volcanic activity and that there was no danger of a tsunami.’

The earthquake in Japan is the most recent in a string of widely publicised earthquakes which includes a 6.8 magnitude quake which struck the northern coast of Papua New Guinea and a separate 7.8 magnitude earthquake which struck the border between Iran and Pakistan all on the same day.

ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Phil Duloy at work in the ShelterBox Operations office.

ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Phil Duloy at work in the ShelterBox Operations office.

The ShelterBox Operations team monitors and prepares for disaster events such as these earthquakes so that they can initiate the fastest response time possible. Utilising a network of partners from within the humanitarian sector, educational bodies, geological, meteorological and seismological experts and logistical and operational partners ensures that ShelterBox can be best prepared to respond quickly.

A global network of volunteer ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) members ready to respond in an instant as well as pre-positioned aid allows ShelterBox to mobilise a team as quickly as possible. ShelterBox is currently responding with active operational deployments in Turkey, Myanmar, Philippines and Senegal and is monitoring disasters in just as many locations. As well as keeping abreast of global disaster patterns it is imperative for the Operations team to constantly review and monitor evolving security situations, sociological and political activity, weather patterns, logistical and transport environments and a raft of other fast-moving but nonetheless crucial elements to safely deploying aid to families in desperate need.

Today the Operations team is reviewing the need and feasibility of deploying aid into Pakistan following the recent earthquake. The region is notoriously difficult logistically but the full extent of the damage following the rurally centred earthquake is also still unknown. You can keep abreast of all of the ongoing deployments and those disasters the Operations team are monitoring in real time on the ShelterBox Facebook and Twitter pages.

It is thanks to the continued support of ShelterBox supporters that the Operations team can continue to monitor disasters around the globe, in turn allowing ShelterBox to help deliver aid to families in desperate need when it is needed. Thank you.

 

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