ShelterBox Responds to Flooding in Uganda

SRT member Eric DeLuca (US) on a previous ShelterBox deployment in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 2009.

SRT member Eric DeLuca (US) on a previous ShelterBox deployment in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 2009.

 

A ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) has just landed in Uganda as continuous heavy rains in the western Kasese region have caused the ‘worst flooding since 1976’, according to the country’s authorities and media reports.

Uganda National Rotary alerted ShelterBox Operations department describing the disaster:

‘… Rains have wreaked havoc in Kasese District… at least six people have been killed… thousands of homes washed away, a hospital inundated, and roads made impassable… the immediate needs are shelter, blankets, water filtration…’

Rivers Nyamwamba, Mubuku, Bulema and Kitakena burst their banks destroying hospitals, crops, gardens, roads, bridges, health centres and homes, displacing over 20,000 people and leaving many families isolated. Moreover there are fears of waterborne diseases, like cholera, spreading amongst the communities.

Some of the affected families are taking shelter in overcrowded schools and churches whilst the government and humanitarian agencies are coordinating evacuation procedures.

‘Severe damage’

‘Reports we are getting from the field continue to show that numbers of families forced to relocate into camps have continued to rise, even as the rain slowed down slightly over the weekend,’ said SRT member Eric DeLuca (US) in Kampala, Uganda. ‘Officials are working around the clock to rebuild critical infrastructure as the local hospital suffered severe damage and dozens of bridges and roads throughout the region have been destroyed.’

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