ShelterBox Gains From Research and Development

Researchers Chris Hale and Rob Dooley with ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Dave Ray setting up a ShelterBox tent, UK, July 2013.

Researchers Chris Hale and Rob Dooley with ShelterBox Operations Coordinator Dave Ray setting up a ShelterBox tent, UK, July 2013.

 

ShelterBox has teamed up with independent university-based researchers to investigate the thermal properties of its disaster relief tent, looking at the heat lost and heat gained in comparison to other tents.
Comparative testing will be undertaken on ShelterBox’s tent without its thermal liner as well as with a variety of other liners offered in the humanitarian sector. The disaster relief tent manufactured by camping company Vango will also be compared to a standard dome tent made by another leading tent manufacturer, to see where it sits alongside a competitor. This study will help ShelterBox move forward with future procurements of aid items such as thermal liners, which have been used in our winterised aid kits over the past year in Iraq, Lebanon and North Korea.
‘Two of ShelterBox’s core values are innovation and accountability,’ said Logistics Manager Shane Revill who is managing this study. ‘Not only are we always looking to improve the quality of our aid package but we are also dedicated to delivering the best aid package that represents value for money while being accountable to our supporters, partners and every person who receives support from ShelterBox.’
Chris Hale (left) and Rob Dooley (right) at ShelterBox headquarters, Cornwall, UK, July 2013.

Chris Hale (left) and Rob Dooley (right) at ShelterBox headquarters, Cornwall, UK, July 2013.

 

Chris Hale is an undergraduate student in Renewable Engineering with 15 years experience in the mechanical engineering industry. He is from Cornwall where ShelterBox headquarters is based and where the research is being undertaken.
‘I wanted to be involved’
‘I have wanted to be involved with ShelterBox’s work for a while now so it’s great being part of this project and using my skillset to assist in the research,’ said Chris.
‘I am heading up the scientific side of things doing the quantitative data, comparing different tents by taking various readings as well as being aware of the numerous climate conditions ShelterBox works in compared to the UK.  Over 60% of the locations the disaster relief charity works in have warmer climates than here.’
Rob Dooley not only is a student in Sustainable Product Design but also Creative Director at an industrial design firm in Cornwall where he works with consumer product design for businesses and organisations including charities.
‘My part in this study focuses on the qualitative research, the people side of things,’ commented Rob. ‘I have been holding focus groups with staff and ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) members, who I have all received interesting feedback from. My findings will then be compared to Chris’s quantitative findings which can lead us to more results.’
‘Plan for the future’
Chris and Rob’s research and development (R&D) efforts will help develop the tent and anything related to the tent including other ShelterBox aid.
‘R&D is vital to our success and will help develop our plan for the future,’ continued Shane. ‘It will help with everything to do with the kit we provide as aid and we should eventually end up with the best kit that is most appropriate to what we are trying to achieve – helping people worldwide made homeless by disasters as efficiently and effectively as we can.’

 

 

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