Rotary And ShelterBox Renew Partnership To Aid Disaster Survivors Worldwide

Greg in Vanuatu

Last year, Rotarian and Australian SRT member, Greg Moran (far right) became the first serving District Governor to deploy with ShelterBox. (Image – Vanuatu 2015)

The following is a press release from Rotary International:

Rotary and disaster relief charity ShelterBox renewed a three-year agreement to provide immediate, lifesaving assistance to survivors of natural disasters and conflict.

 

Rotary clubs worldwide have mobilized to provide immediate relief to thousands of displaced people quickly and efficiently with ShelterBox for 16 years. To date, Rotary members have donated US$48 million to provide shelter for families in need – 40 percent of ShelterBox’s total of US$119.6 million raised.

 

Australian SRT member, Peter Pearce takes part in Exercise Sea Dawn

Australian SRT member and Rotarian, Peter Pearce deployed 20 times with ShelterBox and was recently awarded the OAM for his humanitarian service. (Image – Exercise Sea Dawn with the ADF 2014)

 

“The partnership between Rotary and ShelterBox has provided a place of refuge to people facing some of the most difficult and uncertain moments in their lives,” said John Hewko, general secretary of Rotary. “We are happy to renew this project partnership and honor our ongoing commitment to taking action to help communities devastated by disasters and conflict.”

 

Each ShelterBox container typically provides a tent designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, along with regionally appropriate supplies such as a water purification kit, blankets, tools, solar lights, and other necessities to help a family survive for six months or more after a disaster.

 

As part of the communities they serve, Rotary clubs help ShelterBox identify and prioritize immediate relief needs in disaster-affected areas and assist with the deployment of shelter kits, education materials and lifesaving supplies. Rotary members also fund aid boxes, become trained relief volunteers, assist with shipping customs clearance and connect with governments and other organizations in impacted areas to facilitate the delivery of boxes and aid. CEO of ShelterBox, Chris Warham said, “Rotary and ShelterBox will always stand side by side to help those less fortunate. This project partnership renewal simply indicates the strength of our long friendship, and recognizes the immense practical and funding support provided by Rotary members worldwide to enable us to reach out to families in distress.”

Derek Locke in Nigeria 2012

Rotarian and SRT member from the US, Derek Locke recently received the ‘Service Above Self’ form Rotary International for his work with ShelterBox. (Image – Nigeria 2012)

 

About Rotary

Rotary brings together a global network of volunteers dedicated to tackling the world’s most pressing humanitarian challenges. Rotary connects 1.2 million members of more than 35,000 Rotary clubs in over 200 countries and geographical areas. Their work improves lives at both the local and international levels, from helping families in need in their own communities to working toward a polio-free world. To access broadcast quality video footage and still photos go to: The Newsmarket.

 

About ShelterBox

ShelterBox has provided emergency shelter and lifesaving supplies for families affected by more than 270 disasters in more than 95 countries, and has already helped over 1 million beneficiaries. Based in Cornwall, United Kingdom, with 18 international affiliates, ShelterBox is an international disaster relief charity that delivers emergency shelter, warmth, and dignity to people made homeless by disasters worldwide. The agreement with Rotary reaffirms the charity’s volunteer base, enhancing its capacity to respond rapidly to disasters while keeping costs low. ShelterBox teams and their distribution partners are currently operating in Ecuador, Paraguay, Sri Lanka, Niger, Cameroon, Syria and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

ENDS

ShelterBox Australia General Manager, Mike Greenslade (himself a member of the Rotary Club of Alstonville) said,

The renewing of the Project Partnership agreement with Rotary International is great news for both organisations. ShelterBox has moved on hugely since the original agreement was signed, for instance, we no longer only supply ShelterBoxes but instead have a large range of equipment that we can tailor to suit the needs of the beneficiaries. ShelterBox provides a great opportunity for Rotarians to get involved with international service wether it be an Ambassador or a Response Team member.

June in Seoul

ShelterBox Australia Ambassador and Rotarian, June Wade at the RI Convention in Seoul 2016

I’ve deployed many times with ShelterBox and have seen the value of Rotary in action in almost every country I’ve visited. Here in Australia,  Rotarians are essential to the day-to-day running of the organisation and fundraising from clubs and Ambassadors forms a huge part of our income. Put simply, without Rotary we would not be able to help so many people in desperate need’

Second Major Earthquake Wreaks Further Havoc In Nepal

The second earthquake in two weeks causes yet more devastation in Nepal

The second earthquake in two weeks causes yet more devastation in Nepal

 

Just two weeks after a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated large parts of Nepal, leaving thousands dead and millions without homes, a second powerful quake has rocked the country.
 
The 7.4 magnitude earthquake hit the town of Namche Bazar, near Mount Everest. Just like the first disaster two weeks ago, this quake could be felt as far away as Delhi and has been followed by several powerful aftershocks.
ShelterBox currently has several response teams working in the country to provide shelter for the people who were made homeless by the first quake.
The teams, made up of Andrew Clark (UK), Dave Ray (UK), Phil Duloy (UK), Becky Maynard (UK), Sallie Buck (UK), Dave Hallett (CAN), Mike Peachey (NZ), Nicola Hinds (UK), Peter Pearce (UK), Andrew Kukielka (UK) Liz Odell (UK) and Liam Arthur (UK), are based in Kathmandu and the remote district of Sindhupalchok and are all currently safe.
ShelterBox response team member Liam Arthur, who is based in Sindhupalchok, described his experience of the second quake:
‘As we were standing, we were engulfed in clouds of dust. The few buildings left standing around us, are now starting to fall down and everyone has started to stream towards the remaining areas of open space.’
Liam managed to capture the earthquake in this video:

So far, our response teams succeeded in providing shelter to almost 1,000 people in remote communities in the mountainous district of Sindhupalchok, despite almost impassable roads and heavy storms. They have also given tents to several hospitals in Kathmandu to provide safe spaces for people injured by the earthquakes to be treated.
However, the events of this morning mean that thousands of communities, many of whom were just starting to recover from the first earthquake, are now in need of more help than ever before.
Your support means that our ShelterBox response teams can continue their work to provide shelter to communities in need, no matter how remote they may be. PLEASE DONATE HERE

Tents And Shelter Kits Arrive, To Begin Their Ascent To The Mountains Of Nepal

Smiling Nepalese man and woman unload a large tent from a truck

Local volunteers in Chautara help unload Shelterbox aid

There are smiles in these photos, as the arrival of 39 tons of ShelterBox aid brings hope to remote villages in earthquake-shattered Nepal.

International disaster relief charity ShelterBox is gearing up its operation in the uplands of Nepal. In the early hours of this morning 39 tons of much-needed shelter aid left Kathmandu’s busy airport, heading in trucks up steep winding roads towards the mountain district of Sindhupalchowk.

This shipment contains 500 family tents, made to United Nations specifications. There are also 500 ShelterBox shelter kits, containing tools to help clear rubble and saw wood, and – most importantly – waterproof tarpaulins and fixings to create basic, dry shelters, or to make the best of habitable parts of damaged buildings.

They will soon be on their way to selected sites among Sindhupalchowk’s  79 village communities, among the highest inhabited altitudes in the world.

A group of local volunteers from the community of Chautara  helped ShelterBox’s Liz Odell and Liam Norris unload the equipment into an abandoned hospital, which is being used as a storage facility.

Liz Odell explains, ‘The doctors have moved to a local football field where ShelterBox is contributing tents to provide space for the medics to work and live. The hospital building is badly damaged and unsafe to work in.’

ShelterBox is working with the Nepal Red Cross to distribute the aid to families in remote areas badly affected by the earthquake. Helicopters still come and go, airlifting people in need of medical assistance, and carrying aid to communities that can be reached only by air or on foot.

Men loading large tents at airport

ShelterBox Response Team volunteers, Peter Pearce (AUS) and Dave Hallett (CAN) load UN spec. tents at Kathmandu Airport

ShelterBox has strengthened its Nepal team in recent days, and now has twelve people working in country. Phil Duloy (UK) was the original in country co-ordinator, and is now deputising for Andrew Clark (UK) as is Dave Ray (UK). Dave has experience of shelter cluster management in Malawi, so will also be cluster liaison. Nicola Hinds, Becky Maynard and Liz Odell, all from the UK, were in place within days of the earthquake. They have since been joined by Sallie Buck (UK), Dave Hallett (Canada), Mike Peachey (New Zealand), Peter Pearce (Australia), Liam Norris (UK) and Andrew Kukielka (UK). More will follow to refresh or replace teams, as ShelterBox expects to be in Nepal for some time.

In addition to today’s consignment of 1,000 tents and kits, 53 ShelterBoxes are already in Nepal, with a further 1,500 now in transit. 500 more shelter kits are landing this afternoon, and a further 1,736 are in Dubai awaiting charter flights. ShelterBox already had 72 ShelterBoxes in Kathmandu when the earthquake struck, as it had responded to flooding and landslides in Nepal last Autumn. The tents from those boxes are being used as outdoor clinic space in four Kathmandu hospitals, and now in Chautara.

ShelterBox Chief Executive Alison Wallace says, ‘ShelterBox responded rapidly to this disaster, and had the practical advantage of having some aid already in the country, which had an instant use to create extra hospital space. Kathmandu brings its own challenges, and now our teams are working with colleague charities on plans to get to the hardest-to-reach mountain communities. The flow of incoming aid is getting faster, and we now have substantial stock already in country, and much more on the way.’

‘This is a truly international operation, from our team here in Cornwall, through to our multi-country response volunteers on the ground, working with a cluster of partner organisations from all over the world. Every arm of ShelterBox is being flexed – our overseas affiliates, our donors from around the world, our big-hearted supporters, our tireless volunteers.’

‘This organisation runs on generosity and compassion, and we are seeing both on a grand scale in our response to the Nepal earthquake. I want to thank everyone involved for their time and energy, and donations, which will be needed for many weeks to come.’

You can support our efforts in Nepal and other countries by donating here: PLEASE DONATE or phone 1300 996 038

 

ShelterBox Working With CARE in Vanuatu

A Vanuatu woman stands by a massive tree which crushed a nearby vehicle (CARE/Tom Perry)

A Vanuatu woman stands by a massive tree which crushed a nearby vehicle (CARE/Tom Perry)

Last week, as news of the scale of the Typhoon was starting to become clear, the ShelterBox Operations Department approached the government of Vanuatu, other aid agencies and the humanitarian departments of the governments of Australia and New Zealand- which often take an active role in supporting disaster responses in the pacific. These parties were all informed of ShelterBox’s active interest and material capacity to provide assistance in the wake of the storm.

ShelterBox is planning to send an initial response of 1,000 IFRC (International Federation of the Red Cross) specification shelter kits to Vanuatu from prepositioned stocks.

ShelterBox response team members, Peter Pearce (AUS) and Ross Mackenzie (NZ), arrived in Vanuatu and met with CARE International on Wednesday to discuss our response. It is planned that CARE International will distribute the shelter kits on behalf of ShelterBox. A team from CARE international have carried out an initial assessment of the island, which suggests that there are approximately 5,000 people in need of assistance. They are reporting that they believe shelter kits and blankets to be the most appropriate form of aid for this disaster.

Ross Mackenzie said: ‘The modern buildings have mostly suffered roof damage, but all the traditional houses have been demolished. All schools and business on the island are either partially or totally destroyed.

CARE, who will be our implementing partner for this response, is also the lead international agency operating on the island of Tanna. The response on this island will be divided up into two areas of responsibility, with World Vision working in the north west and south areas, while CARE focuses on the north east of the island around the Yasur Volcano, White Sands and Middle Brush, where approximately 1,000 families have been affected.

Information on Shelter Kits:

ShelterBox shelter repair kit v2[1]

 

ShelterBox uses the IFRC shelter kit, which consists of 2 tarpaulins, rope, handsaw, roofing nails, shovel, hoe, shears, large nails, small nails, wire and a claw hammer. They are a flexible solution; they can be combined with a variety of locally available materials such as timber, bamboo, and roofing sheets to create shelters, as well as providing the means to continue with other aspects of life.

Shelter kits are fast and simple to deploy; pre-packaged and prepositioned shelter kits can be rapidly deployed internationally and, because of their relatively small size, are easier to transport and distribute in situations when the local logistics hubs have been adversely affected.

First impressions from Ross Mackenzie, part of the ShelterBox Response Team that arrived in Vanuatu on Wednesday:

Flying in yesterday, the view out of the window was one of total devastation – no lush, tropical trees and the damage to buildings varied from minor damage to total destruction.

 

ShelterBox Mobilises Response Team & Aid For Vanuatu

Image of cyclone damage in vanuatu

 

ShelterBox is mobilising aid and a Response Team from Australia and New Zealand as the Pacific paradise of Vanuatu counts the awful cost of Cyclone Pam

 

As news emerges of the scale of devastation caused by one of the worst Pacific storms ever recorded, with many of Vanuatu’s 260,000 population now said to be homeless, emergency shelter experts, ShelterBox have this morning agreed plans for aid distribution with colleague charity CARE International.

The United Nations Humanitarian Office says that on the main island of Efate an estimated 90 per cent of structures are either damaged or destroyed, and thousands of people are sheltering in over 25 evacuation centres across the provinces of Efate, Torba and Penama.

1,000 ShelterBox shelter kits, which will help with repair and waterproofing of damaged buildings, are to be dispatched from storage at Subang Aiport near Kuala Lumpur in Malaysia. The kits, now a standard element of ShelterBox’s range of aid, are designed to Red Cross specifications.

Vanuatu’s key air hub, Bauerfield International Airport near the capital Port Vila, has had its runway cleared of floodwater only a few hours ago. Aid flights from Australia and New Zealand Air Forces are now able to land, although commercial flights remain suspended. ShelterBox response team members Ross Mackenzie from New Zealand and Peter Pearce from Australia are expected to be able to fly to Vanuatu within days to make preparations for ShelterBox aid distribution.

ShelterBox Operational Manager Alf Evans says, ‘We have been in frequent touch with other aid agencies, making clear our willingness and capability to help. Our initial response will see the 1,000 shelter kits deployed from Subang, and distributed with CARE International. Once we have ShelterBox response team members on the ground we will be aiming to make further contributions to partnership work on shelter and repair.’

First images from Port Vila show most buildings to be badly damaged, and a pilot flying over some of Vanuatu’s 65 inhabited islands reported similar scenes of destruction across remote communities. There is a communications blackout beyond Port Vila, so it is hard to assess the extent of damage or the humanitarian need, though aid workers on the ground have already likened it to Typhoon Haiyan that struck the Philippines 16 months ago.

Vanuatu’s President Baldwin Lonsdale, who is in Japan attending a conference on disaster reduction, described the cyclone as a ‘monster’. He thanked the international aid community for their quick response. Many of the country’s essential services, including schools, hospitals and power generation, are in disarray. The confirmed death toll of eight people is expected to rise sharply as rescuers reach outlying communities.

Cyclone Pam is a category five storm, with winds now said to have peaked at 185mph. It veered off its expected course and struck Vanuatu early on Saturday, local time. It is now heading towards New Zealand, and though it has weakened severe weather warnings have been issued.

“Wheelchairs For Madagascar” – ShelterBox Response Team Member Walks For Charity

Peter Pearce (left) at the end of his marathon walk from John O'Groats to Lands End in sunny Cornwall

Peter Pearce (right) at the end of his marathon walk from John O’Groats to Lands End in sunny Cornwall

Experienced ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) member, Peter Pearce, has just completed a 1,786km walk from John O’Groats on the northern tip of Scotland to Land’s End in his native Cornwall. Peter, who lives on the Central Coast of NSW, is a veteran of 16 ShelterBox deployments and a dedicated Rotarian. It was on one of his deployments with ShelterBox, to Madagascar, that Peter became aware of the plight of the many locals crippled from birth defects. On his return to Australia, Peter decided to do all he could to help.

Working with his local Rotary Club, The Rotary Club of Gosford North, Peter set up the “Wheelchairs For Madagascar” project to help those crippled from birth in the African island nation.

Peter on his long walk south ........

Peter on his long walk south ……..

Peter’s marathon walk South took him 72 days, averaging 20 miles a day. Helped by companion walkers along the way, he was shown hospitality by fellow Rotarians, friends and strangers inspired by his efforts.

The “Wheelchairs For Madagascar” project now has a container of 224 wheelchairs ready to ship and is seeking funds to pay for the freight.

Those wishing to contribute may do so at: https://donations.rawcs.com.au/Default.aspx?ProjectID=562&ReturnTo=4

More Than Shelter In The Philippines

Response Team volunteers Eric DeLuca and Peter Pearce help fix some fishing boats on Kinatarcan island to enable fishermen to return to work quickly to earn money to buy materials to rebuild their homes well, January 2014, Philippines.

Response Team volunteers Eric DeLuca and Peter Pearce help fix some fishing boats on Kinatarcan island to enable fishermen to return to work quickly to earn money to buy materials to rebuild their homes well, January 2014, Philippines.

 

ShelterBox is helping in more ways than providing shelter for Typhoon Haiyan survivors in the Philippines. The international disaster relief charity is also helping communities to rebuild their livelihoods, particularly the fishing industry, according to Response Team volunteer Anne Seuren, who was in the Asian country earlier this year.
‘On Kinatarcan island we met Jeresita Piamonte, a young mother with her three children. Her husband is a fisherman. He spends all night at sea while Jeresita looks after the children. They explained that fishermen have more success at night because they hang their kerosene lanterns over the side of the boat, which attracts the fish, making it easier to catch them by net.
‘Many of the fishing boats in these communities were destroyed during the storm, and as fishing is practically the only economy on the island, many families were forced to spend the first few months trying to rebuild their boats. Most are using the materials aid agencies had given them before they could start earning money to purchase materials for their houses.
Jeresita with her three young children, including her youngest Elzed holding the hammer who is trying to help rebuild their house that is pictured behind them, which was damaged by Typhoon Haiyan, Kinatarcan island, Philippines, January 2014.

Jeresita with her three young children, including her youngest Elzed holding the hammer who is trying to help rebuild their house that is pictured behind them, which was damaged by Typhoon Haiyan, Kinatarcan island, Philippines, January 2014.

 

‘Whilst Jeresita’s husband spent the time rebuilding his boat, Jeresita was trying to rebuild their house in the spare time that she had, after taking care of the children, cleaning and cooking. She was using gathered wood and used pieces of corrugated tin when we went to visit. Her youngest son Elzed was also doing his best to try and help, swinging a hammer in the air with no avail.
‘Overwhelmed’
‘She told me how bad she felt that her young children were having to live in a house that didn’t protect them from the rain, even though she was trying to fix the roof as quickly as she could. Therefore she was overwhelmed when we told her we were giving her and her family a ShelterBox tent the next day.
‘She was speechless and said: ‘Thank you miss.’ I explained to her that it wasn’t just me giving them that tent but it was also thanks to many people worldwide who have helped by donating money. She was amazed that so many people cared.
Response Team volunteer Peter Pearce helps fix some more fishing boats on Kinatarcan island, January 2014, Philippines.

Response Team volunteer Peter Pearce helps fix some more fishing boats on Kinatarcan island, January 2014, Philippines.

 

‘For me it was heartbreaking to see how grateful the Philippine people are. On the other hand it was so good to see they are starting to rebuild their lives. Even knowing how hard it is to have her children sleep in a shack, Jeresita and her husband decided it was the wise thing to do to use the little money they had for materials to first fix their boat.
‘Dry warm place to sleep’
‘It feels good that we can help this family, giving them a dry warm place to sleep until they have saved enough money to repair their house.’
Thank you.

 

 

 

Scouts And Rotary Praised As Peter Pearce Returns From Niger

Rotary Club Niger members with SRT member Peter Pearce (AU) in the middle and past and present Rotarian friend Gaston Kaba on the right, October 2013.

Rotary Club Niger members with SRT member Peter Pearce (AU) in the middle and past and present Rotarian friend Gaston Kaba on the right, October 2013.

Scouts, the Red Cross, the Fire Brigade and Rotarians assisted the ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) in Niger in bringing much-needed shelter to families made homeless by recent widespread flooding in the Niamey region.
ShelterBox often collaborates with others in the field and carries out ‘train-the-trainer’ programmes, meaning that SRT members train people who will then help set up the disaster relief tents, and in turn they will train a group of people to assist on the day. This way aid can be distributed as quickly and efficiently as possible once it arrives to families in need.
‘We arrived at the Sagia site at 8am to try and avoid the hot sun,’ said SRT member Peter Pearce (AU). ‘Niger is an extremely hot country and setting up tents in that heat is always a challenge. Once we had everybody together, we started doing a tent demonstration involving a few people. As soon as the first tent was up, we divided the group into teams who then went on to set up the remaining tents. We decided it would be beneficial to install them at their final position and we collaborated with the site planner in order to determine where the tents would be set up.
The Tsimbsno family outside their new tent, who had been living in cramped conditions in a school for 3 weeks, with the Niamey Scout Leader on the right, October 2013.

The Tsimbsno family outside their new tent, who had been living in cramped conditions in a school for 3 weeks, with the Niamey Scout Leader on the right, October 2013.

‘The camp was set up following humanitarian standards, thereby ensuring families have enough space around them to allow for livestock, meeting areas as well as privacy.
‘Impressed with the Scouts’
‘We were particularly impressed with the Scouts. They are a group of very dedicated and skilled young men, who put up tents superbly. They worked with ShelterBox last year when we responded to flooding in Niger and are proving extremely useful and reliable. They are definitely adding value to our operation.’
Lodovica Tranchini (IT) was on her first deployment and said, ‘Seeing the tents go up, even if it was just for training, was really motivating. It reminded me of why we are here and I felt proud to be involved.’
Once the tents arrived, the camp was set up within a few days and families were moving in their new homes as tents were pitched.
‘Love our ShelterBox tent’
‘We love our ShelterBox tent as when we zip it up it keeps out scorpions, mosquitos and rain,’ commented one family with nine children. ‘It even has a floor. In just three hours the water completely flooded our house; it just melted away leaving us with nothing.’
The Lifestraws in action, Niamey region, Niger, October 2013.

The Lifestraws in action, Niamey region, Niger, October 2013.

ShelterBox also provided Lifestraws (water filters) to Oxfam for them to be used by thousands of people in Agadez who had been drinking out of dirty rivers.
Thanks to all of our supporters for enabling us to help these communities in desperate need in Niger. Without your help our disaster relief work would not be possible. Thank you.
If you wish to make a donation, you can do so here: PLEASE DONATE

Australian SRT Member Reports From Flood-Hit Niger

Saidou Issa (right) with his wife and 2-month-old baby. They lost their home in the floods, Niamey region, Niger, September 2013.

Saidou Issa (right) with his wife and 2-month-old baby. They lost their home in the floods, Niamey region, Niger, September 2013.

 

‘In an emergency situation, I’ve realised how every moment we don’t act, every day that we wait for tents to arrive, is another day that people are left without shelter.’
 
ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) member Lodovicia Tranchini (IT) is on her first deployment in Niger. She has been part of the first SRT who has been assessing the need for emergency shelter and other vital aid, following widespread flash flooding across the African country.
‘I’ve heard some really good things from in-country partner organisations we worked with here last year and they all commend ShelterBox for its efficiency and speed in getting the aid in to the country time and time again.’
The SRT has been working with International Organization for Migration (IOM) and visited some schools where thousands of families have been taking refuge. However, rooms are overcrowded and school is due to start at the beginning of October.
Makeshift shelters built amongst the remains of homes leftover by the floodwaters, Niamey region, Niger, September 2013.

Makeshift shelters built amongst the remains of homes leftover by the floodwaters, Niamey region, Niger, September 2013.

 

33-year-old Saidou Issa is one of the families living in cramped conditions in a classroom. He is with his wife and three children, the youngest being just two months old. Their house was completely destroyed by the floodwaters.
‘No warning’
‘The water came up very quickly,’ Saidou told the SRT. ‘Within two hours it was up to our waists and we had to evacuate. The water pulled down all of our houses; they all disappeared underwater and we had no warning.’
Saidou is one example of the 1,000 families currently living across several schools in need of shelter. When school resumes, they need to move out to avoid disrupting education.
‘ShelterBox tents arriving tonight’
‘Without a ShelterBox tent they would be sleeping outside,’ said SRT member Peter Pearce (AU). ‘We have ShelterBox disaster relief tents arriving tonight and we will begin distributions tomorrow.’
‘While we have been waiting for the tents to arrive we have been training teams of people who will help us set up the tents over the next few days,’ added Lodovicia. ‘So as soon as the tents get here we can hit the ground running and start giving shelter to thousands of families in need.’
SRT members, Lodovicia Tranchini (IT) & Peter Pearce (AU) train local scouts how to erect ShelterBox relief tents.

SRT members, Lodovicia Tranchini (IT) & Peter Pearce (AU) train local scouts how to erect ShelterBox relief tents.

 

 

Australian SRT Member Reports From The Field In Niger

A family uses a boat to get around due to flooding in Niamey, Niger, August 2012.

A family uses a boat to get around due to flooding in Niamey, Niger, August 2012.

 

Homes have collapsed, crops are ruined and animals decimated. People in Niger have been left with nothing following ongoing torrential rains that fell throughout August, causing heavy flooding across the African country. 

As the rains continue, a ShelterBox Response Team (SRT) has arrived in the capital of Niamey to assess the need for emergency shelter and other vital aid including water filtration, with the risk of a cholera outbreak.
‘We are working with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and focussing our efforts in Niamey, a badly-affected area,’ said SRT member Peter Pearce (AU).

‘Disaster is enormous’

‘The scale of the disaster is enormous, with around 91,000 people affected by the flooding. It’s a sad situation as many here depend on farming as their livelihoods and now, just a few weeks before harvest, many farms have been wiped out, leaving families with no income and also no home.
‘We are going to carry out our first assessments as quickly as possible and then assist those families most in need.’
Widespread flooding increases the risk of waterborne diseases such as typhoid fever and cholera. The main cause of outbreaks is the contamination of drinking-water facilities, which is the case now in Niger.

‘Clean, safe drinking water’

‘ShelterBox has water filters currently prepositioned here so as soon as we complete our assessments we will distribute them, providing clean, safe drinking water to targeted communities,’ added SRT member Lodovica Tranchini (IT).
Syria Refugee Appeal image courtesy of Aram Karim/Metrography

Syria Refugee Appeal image courtesy of Aram Karim/Metrography