Truckloads Of Tarps Arrive As ShelterBox Continues Its Aid Push In Rain-Swept Nepal

Nepalese villager help unload a truck of Shelterbox aid

Local volunteers assist in delivering ShelterBox aid to the people of Pipaldanda in Nepal

 

Intense rainfall, flash flooding, landslides, and difficult  traveling conditions. Nepal, devastated by two major earthquakes, is suddenly in the grip of its monsoon season. But international disaster relief charity, ShelterBox, in the latest phase of a response that is now into its third month, is on the way with urgently needed equipment to help communities shelter and rebuild.

ShelterBox’s team in Nepal has just taken delivery of three truckloads of aid that have made the long overland journey from Delhi in India. The 12,000 waterproof tarpaulins are now safely stored in a Kathmandu warehouse operated by partner organisation, the Agency for Technical Co-operation and Development (ACTED).

A further shipment of 2,500 tarps has arrived by air from ShelterBox stock in Dubai, and is now bound for the rural district of Sindhupalchok, close to the epicentre of the first earthquake.

This is the latest phase in ShelterBox’s response to the two Nepal earthquakes. ShelterBox volunteers have now been in-country continuously since 27 April. The earliest distributions were of prepositioned stocks of ShelterBoxes used to create clinical space for damaged hospitals.

Subsequently ShelterBox distributed thousands of shelter kits to high altitude communities – including some deliveries made in partnership with the Royal Gurkha Rifles – and of UN specification tents. And, more recently, orphanages across the Kathmandu Valley received school equipment in SchoolBoxes, as part of a joint project with the local Rotary Club of Bhadgaon.

So far an estimated 15,000 people have received ShelterBox aid. Now, with three months of monsoon downpours underway, waterproof tarps are in great demand.

ShelterBox’s In-Country Coordinator Toby Ash says, ‘The needs we are meeting are many, various and constantly changing. We also have to work within Nepal’s own rules and import restrictions, and have to be patient with bureaucracy and paperwork. So our team welcomes these latest consignments of practical and highly portable aid, and we’re discussing with partners how best to get them to the remote communities who need them most.’

In the longer term ShelterBox is talking to ACTED about ways to reach areas of Nepal that have not yet received assistance, and a possible future project to create quake-resistant dwellings.

Toby adds, ‘As is so often the case, even though a humanitarian disaster has slipped from the headlines, there is still plenty of aid work to be done. In Nepal ShelterBox remains focused on helping people who are living in poor conditions with inadequate shelter.’

You can support the work of ShelterBox by donating here: PLEASE DONATE

 

Shelter For More Than 15,000 People In Nepal

Nepalese villager help unload a truck of Shelterbox aid

Local volunteers assist in delivering ShelterBox aid to the people of Pipaldanda in Nepal

 

ShelterBox has now been able to provide shelter for more than 15,000 people whose lives were turned upside down following the recent Nepal earthquakes.
Despite the second major earthquake to hit the country last week, which measured 7.3 in magnitude, our ShelterBox response teams have been working tirelessly to reach families whose homes have been destroyed or badly damaged.
The teams have been working with fellow aid agencies the Nepal Red Cross Society, the Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED), the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), and Handicap International to help coordinate and distribute supplies of aid.
So far, more than 2,600 shelter kits and almost 500 UN specification tents have been distributed to families in a variety of areas including the capital of Kathmandu, and the districts of Dhading and Sindhupalchok. Each tent will provide vital shelter for a family whose home has been destroyed, while shelter kits contain the vital items to enable families to create temporary shelters and start repairing their damaged homes.
Our teams have been further helped by local volunteers, including people like Rom Singh Basnyal, who has been helping distribute aid to other families despite suffering a great deal of loss after the earthquake.
Rom Singh Basnyal, a local volunteer who has been helping distribute ShelterBox aid.

Rom Singh Basnyal, a local volunteer who has been helping distribute ShelterBox aid.

Rom comes from the village of Pipaldanda in the district of Sindhupalchok, but is currently working as a lawyer in Kathmandu. After the first earthquake took place, he travelled by bus and then on foot for further hour and a half to get back to his hometown.  When he arrived, he returned to find his family home destroyed and his mother buried under the rubble.
Rom had to carry his mother’s body to a burial spot a few miles away before returning to help other villagers recover the bodies of the dead. It took five days for them to recover all of the people who had been buried in the disaster.
Thankfully, the rest of Rom’s family survived and ShelterBox has provided them with a tent to help them shelter from the coming monsoon rains. Rom had walked for an hour and a half from the village through high mountainous terrain to help our response teams load up the first of our trucks travelling to Pipaldanda with tents for the villagers.
ShelterBox response team member Liz Odell shows villagers in Pipaldanda how to put up the tents that were distributed.

ShelterBox response team member Liz Odell shows villagers in Pipaldanda how to put up the tents that were distributed.

Help from people like Rom, along with cooperation from other organisations, is crucial in helping our aid to reach remote communities in Nepal’s mountainous landscape. However, we still need your support to make sure that we can continue to provide the shelter to keep families safe and dry before the monsoon rains arrive.

You can help our efforts in Nepal and other countries affected by disaster by donating here: PLEASE DONATE

Second Major Earthquake Wreaks Further Havoc In Nepal

The second earthquake in two weeks causes yet more devastation in Nepal

The second earthquake in two weeks causes yet more devastation in Nepal

 

Just two weeks after a massive 7.8 magnitude earthquake devastated large parts of Nepal, leaving thousands dead and millions without homes, a second powerful quake has rocked the country.
 
The 7.4 magnitude earthquake hit the town of Namche Bazar, near Mount Everest. Just like the first disaster two weeks ago, this quake could be felt as far away as Delhi and has been followed by several powerful aftershocks.
ShelterBox currently has several response teams working in the country to provide shelter for the people who were made homeless by the first quake.
The teams, made up of Andrew Clark (UK), Dave Ray (UK), Phil Duloy (UK), Becky Maynard (UK), Sallie Buck (UK), Dave Hallett (CAN), Mike Peachey (NZ), Nicola Hinds (UK), Peter Pearce (UK), Andrew Kukielka (UK) Liz Odell (UK) and Liam Arthur (UK), are based in Kathmandu and the remote district of Sindhupalchok and are all currently safe.
ShelterBox response team member Liam Arthur, who is based in Sindhupalchok, described his experience of the second quake:
‘As we were standing, we were engulfed in clouds of dust. The few buildings left standing around us, are now starting to fall down and everyone has started to stream towards the remaining areas of open space.’
Liam managed to capture the earthquake in this video:

So far, our response teams succeeded in providing shelter to almost 1,000 people in remote communities in the mountainous district of Sindhupalchok, despite almost impassable roads and heavy storms. They have also given tents to several hospitals in Kathmandu to provide safe spaces for people injured by the earthquakes to be treated.
However, the events of this morning mean that thousands of communities, many of whom were just starting to recover from the first earthquake, are now in need of more help than ever before.
Your support means that our ShelterBox response teams can continue their work to provide shelter to communities in need, no matter how remote they may be. PLEASE DONATE HERE