Mindanao Earthquake – Veronica’s Story

 

In October 2019, three powerful earthquakes shook Mindanao Island in the Philippines, damaging and destroying buildings. Thousands of people were forced to leave their homes, staying in evacuation centres or with host families. Those who had been hit the hardest stayed in makeshift shelters and were not expected to return home for up to six months.

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Veronica lives at the very top of a mountainous barangay in Mindanao. Along with her family, she was one of the thousands of people affected by the earthquakes. Speaking to the ShelterBox team when they returned to Mindanao to do post-distribution monitoring in December 2019, Veronica said she is proud of where she lives. She added that it is very beautiful with two rivers flowing either side of her home and lots of colourful flowers surrounding it.

The team were unable to get to see her homesite as it was still unsafe for vehicles other than motorbikes to get up there. Fortunately, Veronica’s husband Rodolfo was able to go to up on his motorbike and capture some images of their home that had been rebuilt using ShelterBox tools and tarpaulin.

Veronica told the team she was in her home when the earthquake, which measured 6.6 magnitude, hit on the 29th of October at 9am. She first felt the shaking and then cement started to fall from the ceilings and from the walls. She instantly ran outside until the initial shaking stopped. Her priority was then to run to the school further down the hill to go and see how her youngest daughter was. “I was so scared not knowing how the earthquake had hit the school,” she said. “I ran as fast as I could to get there.”

The school had been severely damaged with parts of it collapsing. The teachers left to go home and see if their families were OK, and what might have happened to their homes.

“Many of us here thought that as Christmas was near, no more earthquakes would hit us,” said Veronica.

At the time of the earthquake Rodolfo was working on their farm. The farm was badly affected, and a large crack appeared through the land. Fortunately, he was able to return to the family unharmed.

“Our house was unsafe to live in,” Veronica explained. “Two walls had collapsed, and the aftershocks meant that cement kept falling from the ceiling.” After the earthquake, the only form of shelter the family had was one tarpaulin. To ensure the whole family was protected from the weather they had to borrow another tarpaulin from Veronica’s brother. This meant they were living in cramped conditions.

Two weeks after the earthquakes hit, the family received aid items from ShelterBox. This included a shelter kit with two tarpaulins, two solar lights, two blankets and a bag to put everything in. They used these items to build a new shelter close to their damaged home until it was safe to return.

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“We are so grateful for the ShelterBox tarpaulins as they are so much better than the ones we had,” said Veronica. “We feel that come rain or shine we are able to feel comfortable inside the home we have made with them and as a result we are now sleeping better.”

Despite the hot weather the tarpaulins keep her family cooler in the day. Veronica said that all the community members at the top of the barangay had used their aid items. Their community does have electricity, but they experience frequent black outs, so the solar lights are used a lot. In case of another earthquake, Veronica said she has prepared a grab bag for the family to take: “We used the bag to carry items back from the distribution, but now we store emergency clothing and other important items in it, just in case another earthquake happens, and we have to leave the area quickly.”

They are not too sure what the future holds for them as they cannot access the farm due to the risk of landslides. But now that they have somewhere to live, her husband is able to focus on looking for a temporary job until the farmland becomes safe or they find an alternative site.

Truckloads Of Tarps Arrive As ShelterBox Continues Its Aid Push In Rain-Swept Nepal

Nepalese villager help unload a truck of Shelterbox aid

Local volunteers assist in delivering ShelterBox aid to the people of Pipaldanda in Nepal

 

Intense rainfall, flash flooding, landslides, and difficult  traveling conditions. Nepal, devastated by two major earthquakes, is suddenly in the grip of its monsoon season. But international disaster relief charity, ShelterBox, in the latest phase of a response that is now into its third month, is on the way with urgently needed equipment to help communities shelter and rebuild.

ShelterBox’s team in Nepal has just taken delivery of three truckloads of aid that have made the long overland journey from Delhi in India. The 12,000 waterproof tarpaulins are now safely stored in a Kathmandu warehouse operated by partner organisation, the Agency for Technical Co-operation and Development (ACTED).

A further shipment of 2,500 tarps has arrived by air from ShelterBox stock in Dubai, and is now bound for the rural district of Sindhupalchok, close to the epicentre of the first earthquake.

This is the latest phase in ShelterBox’s response to the two Nepal earthquakes. ShelterBox volunteers have now been in-country continuously since 27 April. The earliest distributions were of prepositioned stocks of ShelterBoxes used to create clinical space for damaged hospitals.

Subsequently ShelterBox distributed thousands of shelter kits to high altitude communities – including some deliveries made in partnership with the Royal Gurkha Rifles – and of UN specification tents. And, more recently, orphanages across the Kathmandu Valley received school equipment in SchoolBoxes, as part of a joint project with the local Rotary Club of Bhadgaon.

So far an estimated 15,000 people have received ShelterBox aid. Now, with three months of monsoon downpours underway, waterproof tarps are in great demand.

ShelterBox’s In-Country Coordinator Toby Ash says, ‘The needs we are meeting are many, various and constantly changing. We also have to work within Nepal’s own rules and import restrictions, and have to be patient with bureaucracy and paperwork. So our team welcomes these latest consignments of practical and highly portable aid, and we’re discussing with partners how best to get them to the remote communities who need them most.’

In the longer term ShelterBox is talking to ACTED about ways to reach areas of Nepal that have not yet received assistance, and a possible future project to create quake-resistant dwellings.

Toby adds, ‘As is so often the case, even though a humanitarian disaster has slipped from the headlines, there is still plenty of aid work to be done. In Nepal ShelterBox remains focused on helping people who are living in poor conditions with inadequate shelter.’

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